Wednesday, January 2, 2013

Is Your Thyroid Cause for Fatigue?



Is Your Thyroid Cause for Fatigue?

Know your thyroid status before a hidden problem drags your energy completely.
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Is your fatigue dragging you from performing routine activities? Does your mental status don’t allowing you to participate in public activities? Do you feel discomfort in the neck? If you are experiencing such a type of issues, it’s a time to check your thyroid status.
Role of thyroid
Thyroid gland is largest endocrine gland located in front of the neck just below Adam’s apple. Thyroid mainly produces two hormones namely, Triidothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) under stimulation by thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) from anterior pituitary. Both T3 and T4 determine the rate of metabolism and activity of other organ systems.
As a master in metabolism, a process in which energy is created to sustain life; thyroid has a direct impact on our energy value and activity level of vital organs of the body.
Causes for your thyroid problems
Anything disturbing the thyroid hormone production can hider metabolism and result in the spectrum of clinical manifestations. More than 200 million people at minimum worldwide have thyroid disease noted in thyroidawarenessmonth.com.
Hyperthyroidism
Excessive hormone production leads to over activity of organ systems and result in hyperthyroidism. Mainly occur in a form of
  • Grave’s disease: Autoimmune disorder where a body attacks an own thyroid.
  • Toxic adenomas:  Abnormal nodule formation in the gland
  • Subacute thyroiditis:  Inflammation of thyroid
  • Postpartum thyroiditis:  Occur in women within a month of delivery
  • Silent thyroiditis:  Temporary state of excess hormone release
  • Excess intake of thyroid hormone during therapy
Hypothyroidism
Little hormone production leads to decreased energy production and manifestations of hypothyroidism. Main causes are
  • Hashimoto’s thyroiditis:  Autoimmune disorder where a body attacks an own thyroid.
  • Medication:  Lithium intake
  • Removal of the gland: Surgically or chemical destruction
  • Exposure to excessive iodide: During radioactive iodine treatment for hyperthyroidism.
 Goitre
  • Enlarged goiter: Due to iodine deficiency. Endemic in certain regions.
Thyroid cancer
Quite rare condition but associated with long-term thyroid nodule.
When to suspect you have thyroid
If you are experiencing any of the following problems do visit your physician, as it can turn out thyroid issue.
  • Swelling in the neck: Feeling of tightness and discomfort in the throat with hoarseness of voice.
  • Fatigue: Feeling tired even after an adequate rest is a characteristic feature of a thyroid problem.
  • Family history :Thyroid run among family members
  • Depression/Anxiety: Anxiety and nervousness associated with insomnia is found in hyperthyroidism. Depression with excessive sleeplessness is typically encountered with hypothyroidism.
  • Heart rhythm: Fast heart rate with palpitations and fine shaking hands is noted in hyperthyroidism. While, heart rate is slowed down in hypothyroidism.
  • Cholesterol abnormalities:  Hyperthyroidism is associated with low cholesterol while hypothyroidism is present with a high-cholesterol level.
  • Weight changes: Unable to lose or gain weight even after good diet control and exercise program.
  • Menstrual irregularity and fertility problem: Women notice light or absent or irregular menses with hyperthyroidism while a hypothyroidism present with a heavy and painful period.
  • Bowel problem:  Hyperthyroidism is characterized by increased bowel movements and subsequent diarrhea or irritable bowel syndrome while hypothyroidism is associated with chronic constipation.
  • Hair changes: Thyroid problems result in hair loss. Dry coarse hair is peculiarly found in hypothyroidism.
  • Skin changes: Warm moist skin with heat intolerance is common in hyperthyroidism and thick, dry and scaly skin with cold intolerance is shared in hypothyroidism.
Dealing with thyroid problems
Your doctor may diagnose thyroid problems with following tests
  • Blood tests: Level of thyroid hormones (T3, T4) and TSH level suggesting under or overproduction of hormone. Detection of anti-thyroid antibodies in autoimmune diseases.
  • Thyroid scan: Radioactive iodide uptake scans indicating the presence of thyroid nodule.
  • Ultrasound:   Benign thyroid nodule detection
  • Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) : Cytological examination for detecting cancer
  • Biopsy: Detect thyroid cancer
Restoration of thyroid hormone levels with anti-thyroid medication, radioiodine treatment and surgery deal with excess or underproduction of hormone.
Thyroid cancer is best treated by surgery, where cancerous tissues or whole thyroid is removed by a surgeon.
Additionally, lifestyle changes with diet supplement, exercises and yoga take care of most of the thyroid symptoms.
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